Party Conference Update, Tuesday 25th

I enjoyed yesterday; the atmosphere in the hall was really energised. The day was dominated by standing ovations – two for Kier Starmer; three for Emily Thornberry and three for Diane Abbott plus several during the Palestine debate, although perhaps the latter should be described as carnival. It was extraordinary to see a sea of flags waving as Harlow CLP moved the motion.

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I did want to speak in the Brexit debate (as did our colleague Charlie Rowley from York Central) but neither of us were picked. It was a good, calm and rational debate on both motions plus the Windrush motion, one that I scarcely recognised from the radio this morning – should I be surprised?

Mick spoke in his ‘reference back’ on Fracking and this was carried overwhelmingly at the end of the day. Mick and I have noticed that whilst Fracking doesn’t appear to be at the forefront of conference business this week there is nevertheless, a strong theme that climate change is right at the top of the party’s agenda. This was evidenced by Rebecca Long- Bailey’s speech yesterday and in a Policy Forum debate that I attended where Barry Gardiner re-iterated that the business and trade forum strongly recognised that the emphasis on Growth and GDP at the cost of sustainability was not a valid approach and he reminded us that he had introduced the Fracking ban.

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At the fringe events Keir Starmer gave his analysis of the reasons that the Brexit negotiations have been so ineffective. He observed that the Tories have approached it from an ideological perspective without first having assessed the needs of the British people or economy. He had worked on the Good Friday agreement and used that example to underline how the Tories had fundamentally failed to understand that the issue was not in any way a technology issue and that it was about Irish history and sensitivities.

Mick has proposed that the NEC convene a meeting of front line CLPs and we await an answer; as he said to the platform yesterday “it wasn’t a rhetorical question”. We have the view that Fracking is an issue for CLPs but not for affliates, especially Unions, but Mick was approached by a representative of Unite who specifically wanted him to know that Unite had supported the reference back.

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It’s the Jeremy’s speech today; I won’t be sitting on the floor in the dark on Thursday morning to write an update so please watch on TV, and I hope to be back on the floor next year. It’s been a really good experience – thanks for selecting me to be your representative.

Party Conference Update, Sunday 23rd

The day began in fiery mood when the Conference Arrangements Committee (CAC) report for the day directed that the issue about Westminster candidate selection be included in the debate on parliamentary democracy and that the proposal to be debated was not open selection but rather, a lowering of the ‘trigger’ threshold to 30%. Conference erupted on the issue. A show of hands to accept or reject the order of business showed an extraordinary divide; from where I was standing it looked like CLPs voted about 90% to reject but the affiliates section was almost unanimous to accept. As the voting arrangements are 50% each there was a card vote that resulted in the order of business was narrowly accepted but it was a raucous first hour.

DnyVO2mXUAYemMf.jpg-large 2018-09-25.jpegThe debate that followed focused on two of the eight proposals: the debate on open selection and the proposal to change the entry criteria for the Leadership and Deputy Leadership ballots to be 10% of MPs and MEPs plus 5% of CLPs or 5% of Affiliates. These went to card votes and Mick and I voted against both in line with the SGM debate. Mick spoke in the debate to ask the NEC to reconsider mandating that CLPs convene a minimum of eight General Meetings a year; pointing out that rural constituencies like ours would find this difficult as many members have far to travel. In the summarising at the end this point was addressed and we were assured that this is an ‘aspiration’ and that the NEC is looking at ways to help facilitate more engagement in rural CLPs and at offering help with technology options – on-linemeetings as an example. Mick’s contribution generated a discussion with a journalist from the Yorkshire Post and – as we walked through Albert Dock at about 10:30 in the evening – a fellow delegate that couldn’t remember the speech but had definitely noticed his ‘fabulous’ legs.

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Most of the morning for Mick and I, plus two colleagues from York Central and Outer, was spent distributing leaflets in support of our Fracking contemporary motion. Now you can’t actually do this within the conference and Mick was told not to. Of course, he took no notice whatsoever and carried on until his second warning. We didn’t get on the agenda but we did our absolute best and my thanks to Charlie and James for their help. We polled 72,890 votes and came sixth on the list but fifth as Brexit got through in the Affiliates ballot- so close with four going through.

We attended two evening events: the Yorkshire and Humberside regional reception where John McDonnell spoke. He reminded us that our region is key to winning the next General Election – something that the day’s rumour mill was saying that the Tories are planning – as we hold a number of key target seats that must be won. For us Scarborough and York Outer are on our doorstep. He encouraged everyone to campaign hard in these seats holding out the prospect that, for the first time in a long time, when we win the GE then a Socialist will walk through the doors of Downing Street.

DnzT_PsX0AMbD3S.jpg-large 2018-09-25.jpegThe second event was a debate on Brexit. We were both disappointed in that event as the platform was strongly advocating a second vote but at the end, when a question from the floor asked what the questions would be, there was no clear answer given. Some on the platform wanted three questions; some wanted two. As it happens, the Brexit compositing debate was taking place at the same time and that has produced a motion close to the one that our CLP chose and debated and close to the Kier Starmer position.

Other points made in the day was that the party is debt free and that we already have funding in place to fight a General Election.

A long day then and I thought that my reflection in the bathroom mirror this morning showed that I had aged more than one day since I last looked. More tomorrow and look out for more tweets.

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Standing ovation as John McDonnell says that we will be proud to call our Government policy, Socialism.

David Milliband says his party has ‘no strategy’ on EU withdrawal and should back Final Say referendum

David Miliband has accused Labour of a “dereliction of duty” over its refusal to back calls for a final say on Brexit.

Speaking on the eve of the party’s annual conference, the former foreign secretary said Labour had “no strategy” for Britain’s withdrawal from the EU.

The issue is expected to dominate the gathering in Liverpool, with Jeremy Corbyn facing mounting pressure to support a public vote on whatever deal Theresa May negotiates with Brussels.

Grassroots activists hope to use the conference to force a change in policy towards backing a final say referendum.

t comes after Theresa May admitted negotiations were at an “impasse” and warned that the UK would leave the bloc without a deal unless EU leaders agree to compromise.

Mr Miliband, a former Labour leadership candidate, told BBC Radio 4 Today: “Labour has got to be much, much stronger. The truth is that waiting for the government to foul up is no strategy at all. The country desperately needs a strong government but it also need a strong opposition.

“Labour’s tragedy over 20 years – and I include my own period in this – is that there was almost a complacency about Europe. The Tory tragedy was to be obsessed about Europe and the Labour tragedy was to be complacent about Europe.”

He added: “Finally the complacency is breaking, at least at the constituency level of the Labour Party, but it’s an absolute dereliction of duty for the Labour Party leadership not to embrace the fundamental principle that since the Brexit that people were sold two years ago is not available, it’s essential that the Brexit deal the prime minister does is put to people.

“The most corrosive thing in the long term will be a Brexit on terms that were missold.”

Mr Miliband predicted Ms May would “eke out” a “paper-thin deal” with Brussels and then “use the threat of no deal and the disaster that represents to try to bludgeon people to support it”.

Update to the Conference Mandating Meeting

4th September 2018

On the first of September, Thirsk and Malton Constituency Labour Party members met in Malton to discuss the constituency’s motion to be sent to the Party Conference to be held in Liverpool from the 23rd to the 26th of September.

There were motions put forward by members concerned with Brexit and Fracking and Climate Change. After a full discussion on both topics, the conference decided to put forward the motion concerning Fracking and Climate change.

Although the meeting recognised the concerns put forward by members on the impact that Brexit would have on the lives of constituents, it was felt that there would be many similar motions put forward by other constituency Labour Parties and that this constituency would be better served by building on its success at the last Labour Party Conference in getting a pledge to ban fracking into the last Party manifesto.

The full text of the motion is:

Action against climate change and fracking

Conference notes:

1)  7th August. Doctors accuse Tory Energy Minister of using Lancashire people as fracking ‘guinea pigs’ despite scientists’ uncertainty over impact on human health.

2)  9th August. Report that four days in London may be as detrimental to health as smoking three cigarettes a day. In Britain 40,000 premature deaths a year because of air pollution.

3) 13th August. Report ‘2018 will be fourth hottest year on record’. The heatwave caused devastating fires and drought.

4) 28th August. Report that air pollution causes reduction of intelligence.

5) Investment in renewables fell by 50% in 2017.

Conference supports:

1) Paris Agreement goal of keeping global temperature rises below 1.5°C

2) Action to raise living standards and build a cleaner future.

a) Taking the big six energy supply companies into public ownershiP
b) A public program of insulating 12 million homes by 2030
c) Taking rail and buses into public ownership
d) Major expansion of public transport
e) Banning combustion engine car sales by 2030 and supporting the UK’s car industry to make electric vehicles

3) Our manifesto pledges to clean up illegal levels of air pollution and ban fracking.

4) Our strategy for 60% of energy to come from low carbon or renewables by 2030 creating hundreds of thousands of new green jobs.

Conference condemns the government’s reckless pursuit of fracking and neglect of renewable energy. Conference notes that the National Policy Forum ignored submissions calling for a campaign against fracking and therefore calls on the Party to lead a co-ordinated national campaign to halt fracking pending election of a Labour Government.

Alan Avery

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Thirsk & Malton Constituency Labour Party
Tel 01751 474043
avery_uk@yahoo.com

 

Mandate Your Conference Delegates

1st September 2018

Your delegates to Labour Party Conference, Mark White and Mick Johnston, are committed to representing your views as well as we possibly can. Conference may be difficult this year with a number of potentially divisive issues, the most obvious being antisemitism and the EU although other very important issues will be on the agenda. Please help us by coming to this Special General Meeeting to debate and vote to determine this Constituency’s policies.

You can, if you wish, submit proposals for a ‘Contemporary Motion’ to Conference but note that the criteria for these (attached) are very tight. If you would like to put forward any motions for debate at this meeting, whether a possible Conference Contemporary Motion or to establish Constituency policy on a Conference issue you must get the wording with proposer and seconder to Mick no later than Monday 27th August.

Late Motions will not be accepted but amendments to anything on the agenda may be put forward for debate at the meeting. Mick will circulate an agenda with any motions received prior to the meeting and will send out the National Policy Forum Annual Report and any other relevant stuff as soon as Mick gets it.

The meeting is from 11.00am to 1.00pm at Ryedale Community and Leisure Centre, Bowling Lane, Off Scarborough Road, Norton, YO17 8EG.

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Link to: CLP Events Archive

To the Gazette and Herald

28thAugust 2019,

Sir,

On 29thMarch 2019, the United Kingdom is due to leave the European Union, on terms as yet not negotiated and with several questions such as the Irish border, the status of UK citizens resident in the EU and our membership of many European institutions still unclear.

The referendum was called in 2016 by the ruling Conservative Party in an attempt to stave off the challenge of UKIP and to unite a Tory Party divided by the question of our membership of the EU. The result of the referendum was narrow but clear. We are leaving the EU. The Labour Party has accepted the result of the referendum but has set out a programme designed to mitigate against the worst excesses of our departure.

But where is the voice of Kevin Hollinrake, the Member of Parliament for the Thirsk and Malton Constituency? Throughout the last General Election campaign he sat on the fence. It is imperative that he now uses the platform offered by this column so that we, his electorate, know where he stands on the major issues of Brexit and can hold him to account. Does he support Brexit or does he support a second referendum or no deal at all with the EU? We look forward to hearing his views.

Alan Avery

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Thirsk & Malton Constituency Labour Party
Tel 01751 474043
avery_uk@yahoo.com

 

European Parliament

The Labour Members of the European Parliament for Yorkshire and the Humber until we leave the European Union in 2019 are Richard Corbett, who is Leader of the Labour Group of MEPs,  and Linda McAvan. They were elected in 2014 and have been very busy working in the EU on our behalf. You can find out a lot about what they have been doing on their websites.

Linda Mcavan MEP
Richard Corbett MEP

Richard has created an app “Doorstep EU” to assist in debunking Brexit propaganda with:

  • Instant analysis of news headlines
  • Straight answers to common questions
  • Evidence-based tabloid myth rebuttals
  • Detailed statistics about the EU’s impact on the UK

Screen Shot 2018-07-16 at 09.35.36.png Doorstep EU, Android Download
Screen Shot 2018-07-16 at 09.35.36.png Doorstep EU, iPhone Download

The European Parliamentary Labour Party website is here at Euro Labour

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The other MEPs elected for Yorkshire and the Humber in 2014 were

  • Timothy Kirkhope (Con)
  • Amjad Bashir (UKIP) –  defected to Tories Jan 2015
  • Jane Collins (UKIP)
  • Mike Hookem (UKIP)

Final Say: Tony Blair backs Independent’s campaign for a referendum on final Brexit deal

Tony Blair has thrown his weight behind The Independent’s Final Say campaign for a referendum on the terms of Brexit.

The ex-prime minister said no-one who voted in the 2016 referendum wanted a poorer country that is forced to stockpile food and medicines, as the UK is now doing.

The Independent kicked off its campaign for a Final Say on whatever Brexit terms emerge next year along with a petition earlier this week.

Within 24 hours almost 200,000 had signed the petition showing the strength of feeling in the wider country for people to have an opportunity to express themselves again.

Mr Blair took to Twitter to say: “33m+ people voted in the EU referendum wanting a better country, not to be poorer, not to put further pressure on our already stretched health service, not for job losses or to stockpile food and medicines. It should be your #Finalsay.

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Theresa May has urged voters not to worry about Brexit, despite her government setting out plans to stockpile food, blood and medicine in case it goes badly.

She said people should take “reassurance and comfort” from news of the plans, to be implemented if the UK crashes out of the EU without an agreement in March next year.

It came after health secretary Matt Hancock admitted he had already met with industry leaders to discuss building up NHS reserves of vaccinations, medical devices, clinical consumables and blood products if Britain crashes out of the EU without a deal.

Dominic Raab, the new Brexit secretary, also recently confirmed preparations were being made to stockpile food, as ministers ramp up planning in case the negotiations fail.

Andy McDonald, Meets with the CLP in Helmsley

On Saturday the 3rd August, the CLP was delighted to welcome Andy McDonald, Shadow Secretary for Transport.  Despite near perfect North Yorkshire weather, 40 members and visitors crowded into the Helmsley Arts Centre. For Andy this was a return visit to his honeymoon town, but he showed no sign of sentiment as he presented an incisive account of Westminster life and the challenges of dealing with our Tory adversaries. Preparing ourselves for the next general election was a key topic – and the CLP is being encouraged to work with neighbouring constituencies to maximize the impact of a Labour vote.

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In the second half of the meeting, small groups discussed priority topics : Rural Deprivation, Peoples Vote, Health and Social Care for Older People, Rail Transport, Bus Transport, Engaging Young People and Housing.  Each group presented their policy wish list in a sentence, and (Westminster please take note) there was a strong consensus in the room. We want young people engaged in politics; a people’s vote on the final Brexit deal; an equitable, not for profit health and social care system; integrated (UK) state run transport and fair rents for all.

Andy’s visit was a catalyst for a great discussion and it was heartening that many people were first attenders – maybe our ambition merely to dent the Tory majority in Thirsk and Malton at the next election should be revised upwards..

Many thanks to Chris and Nick for their hard work in organizing the event (and thanks to Jill for the photo)

Gordon Brown warns of Brexit ‘paralysis’

Britain could be “paralysed” for years because Westminster parties have not “woken up” to the causes of Brexit, ex-prime minister Gordon Brown says.

He said the country risked getting “trapped” in Brexit “small print”.

The former Labour PM told the BBC politicians also needed to focus on low wages, migration and the NHS.

He declined to criticise Jeremy Corbyn personally – saying the current Labour leader was a “phenomenon” who engaged young people in a way he couldn’t.

Mr Brown was the UK’s prime minister between 2007 and 2010 and backed Remain in the EU referendum.

‘Failure to act’

Speaking to BBC political editor Laura Kuenssberg, he said Parliament had not yet grasped the “drivers of the dissatisfaction” that led to the 2016 vote to leave the European Union.

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Unless these “root causes” were addressed, he said: “We will not be able to unite as a nation and we face a future where we are paralysed into inaction by our failure to get our act together and move on.”

He listed stagnant wages, “left-out communities”, migration, sovereignty and the NHS as issues that needed to be addressed alongside the finer points of Brexit, describing the referendum result as a “huge political earthquake”.

Appealing to the “Westminster leaderships”, he added: “We’re not addressing these problems, we’ve got to address them now.”

He was also asked about the sale by the government of another tranche of shares in Royal Bank of Scotland.

Mr Brown, who was prime minister when the bank was bailed out, said there was “no excuse” for selling the shares at under their potential value.

He also warned that “there are still real risks in the financial system”.

See BBC Interview